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Georgians stand with native water protectors

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 Alaskan Natives Canoe into Protectors Camp. Pickens resident Ben Jones of Whitestone Farm travelled to Standing Rock to protest construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. He has started a GoFundMe page, Portable Camp for Earth Protectors, to support the cause.

 

By Glen Law and Ben Jones

    A new war has emerged in the past years, one that so far has had corporate and governmental interest on one side and the Earth with all her living relatives on the other side. Pollution from oil spills, nuclear power plant meltdowns, and fracking have ruined the quality of lives for people around the globe and have permanently destroyed thriving ecosystems.

Steamboats on the north Georgia Rivers

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By Alice Chapman Newgen
Contributing writer
 
    Steamboats were a fairly common mode of transportation in the 1800s traveling up and down rivers that were wide and deep enough to carry them to cities and towns along the riverbanks. Flatboats carried cargo including whiskey, pork, vegetables, and furs to many marketplaces before steamboats became more popular. These flatboats would occasionally transport passengers to various destinations.

More hot & dry weather expected into early fall

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Image / NOAA
    Parts of north Georgia received between 10 and 15 inches of rain during August moving us to what experts are calling drought conditions.

By Pam Knox
University of Georgia

    Rainfall in August reduced the area of extreme drought in northern Georgia. However, abnormally dry conditions and drought expanded in central and south Georgia, especially in coastal areas.
    August’s heat and variable rainfall had a significant impact on agriculture. Army worms became rampant in many pastures. The moist conditions in wet areas led to fungal diseases, which affected peanuts and vegetable crops. Rain hampered the harvest of corn in some locations, while corn in other locations didn’t set kernels

Big Canoe artist’s unusual career turns

Not just a painter of bears

feight-painting    “The Picnic of the Pavilion Party”  -  Inspired by  Renoir's painting in 1882 “Luncheon of the Boating Party.” Feight said it represents “as the river flows continuously, our moment for love and a sense of grace is now.” Click here for a short film that brings this painting to life.
    Feight is a director of the Eagle’s Nest park on Mt. Oglethorpe where this painting was done. Look for this story online to see a link to an accompanying video.

    John Feight, the Big Canoe artist, may be most recognized locally for his “Blackie” series which can be found in regular rotation at the Black Bear Pub inside the gated community.
    What viewers may not realize about the artist behind humorous paintings of a black bear in various historical scenes (an ursine Forrest Gump), is Feight has an impressive body of non-bear art, including a show in Paris, a

Property taxes going up 10.4%

Commissioners trim slightly following public furor
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    Commission Chair Rob Jones listens to a question Thursday on the property tax increase, as Becky Denney and Jerry Barnes look on.
    Speaking from the audience at the final hearing on a county property tax increase, Edwin Weaver told how he had gone to the grocery store to buy six steaks.
    When the clerk told him he lacked the cash, he agreed he didn’t have the money but that “it is in my budget.” You don’t get the steaks without the money, he said, telling the commissioners the county needs to start eating ground beef instead of steak we can’t afford, to a roomful of applause.
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