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Story on mother of autistic child generates overwhelming response

BradleyKellyIngram

“I can’t keep up with everything that’s been happening,” said Kelly Ingram, who was featured in an article in last week’s edition of the Progress.

In the article Ingram described her emotional and spiritual journey raising her autistic son, Bradley.

“People have read that and the article is everywhere,” she said. “I’m getting Facebooked and emailed from people I don’t even know.”

Jasper hiker completes Appalachian Trail

 

McGhee-App-trailLongtime Jasper veterinarian Mike McGhee completed a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail on August 19th.

Here’s a look at his hike on the 2,181 mile trail by the numbers:

• 143 days - total number of days on the trail.

• 20 days  - spent not hiking at all.

• 15 miles  - overall daily average. This figures in the days spent not hiking.

• 27 miles – longest single day.

• 4 pairs - shoes used, favorite pair were trail runners, not hiking boots. Each pair had been bought and broken in prior to starting and sent ahead to mail spots along the trail.

• 20 pounds - usual weight of pack first day out of a town. As food was eaten it would get lighter each day until resupplying.

• 39 pounds – weight lost on trail. McGhee started the hike at 189 pounds and finished 150.

• 10 bears sighted – Five in New Jersey, four in Virginia, 1 in Vermont

No sidewalks, no streetlights, no safety -- Parents spell out objections to bus stops

 

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Most parents speaking at a concerned citizens meeting Tuesday related similar lists of objections to the new bus stops used by the school system: The centralized stops require children as young as kindergarten to walk by themselves on  roads with no street lights or sidewalks, facing the dangers of traffic, sexual predators and wildlife.

Between 50 and 60 parents turned out for the meeting to voice their fears that the new bus stops are dangerous. As promised by lead organizer Willie Prather, everyone was allowed to speak as long as they wanted with the meeting running well past two hours as parent after parent told of their specific complaints to the new stops instituted this school year. Prior to this year, the school buses in Pickens County essentially ran “door-to-door” service. School faculty say combining bus stops, staggering school start times so that some drivers run two routes will save $120,000 this year, by eliminating some driver positions and buses.

School board chairman Wendy Lowe and vice-chair Byron Long attended the meeting, both addressing the group. Commissioner Rob Jones and Sheriff Donnie Craig were also on hand to hear from the citizens, although neither has any direct involvement in school transportation.

 

See updates on this story, parent comments and school board response in this week’s print edition.

 

 

Man sentenced for killing Fla. panther in Georgia

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Press Release

Florida panther killed by David Adams in Troup County, GA on Nov. 16, 2008. Photo: Georgia DNR.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Wednesday that David Adams, 60, formerly of Newnan, Georgia, was sentenced today in United States District Court, Northern District of Georgia, after pleading guilty to the unlawful take of a Florida panther, a species listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

According to court documents and other information presented in court, on November 16, 2008, Adams shot and killed a cougar known as a Florida panther while deer hunting in Troup County, Ga.  At the time of the shooting, Adams knew he was shooting at a species of cougar, for which there was no open hunting season in the State of Georgia.  The bullet fired from Adams’ gun entered the Florida panther in the rear portion of the rib cage by the right hindquarters just below the spine and lodged in the inside of the panther’s right front shoulder.

The Florida panther has been listed as an endangered species since March 11, 1967.  The Puma concolor coryi (the scientific name for the Florida panther) is a sub-species of the Puma concolor, which is known by many names such as, cougar, puma, catamount, and mountain lion.

Loose marble on courthouse prompts more testing

Evan Howell (center), of Blue Ridge Marble & Granite Company, hands down a marble slab freshly removed from the top left corner of the main face of the Pickens County Courthouse. Courthouse construction Project Manager Thurman Slone stands at right.

 

Testing resumed Monday morning to judge how tightly the marble face of the courthouse adheres after workers discovered last week that some marble near the roof edge came off too easily. Evan Howell and Terry Long, of Nelson's Blue Ridge Marble & Granite Company, went aloft two stories on a scissors lift around 9 a.m. as county workers watched from the courthouse lawn.

Howell and Long were up the courthouse face to pick down another piece of marble facing from the highest run at the wall's upper left edge. Last week, after a similar piece was found to be too easily loosened, yellow barrier tape went up on the terrace below. Monday's work was apparently to see how many other pieces of courthouse facing might be loosely in place. The marble facing dates from mid 20th century.