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General news and features

Hood Road park work underway



City of Jasper crews took advantage of the warmer and drier weather Friday to work on a new park in the Hood Road area north of downtown.

The city is using an industrial blower connected to the long metal tube (seen at the front of the pile) to pump air into the brush to make it burn hotter.

When the photo was taken, the city employees were just beginning work. Once the fire gets going, there should be little smoke as the constant flow of air makes the flames hotter and quickly gets rid of the moisture, which causes the heavy smoke.
Mayor John Weaver said the winds on Friday allowed them to burn as the smoke that was created blew back into the 62 acres of woodland for the park.


See complete story on the forthcoming park, "New Jasper park to be big on trees, trails" in this week's print and e-edition.


Tater Patch’s Grace and Glorie continues run


     Deb Heimler (l) and Pat Northcutt (r) discuss the finer points of a country breakfast in Tater Patch Players’ next production.    Grace and Glorie opens Friday, March 7, at 7:30. This funny and moving play will be shown at 7:30 on March 7, 8, 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 7:30 and March 10 and 17 at 2. Tickets are $15 for adults and $14 for seniors and students.
    They may be bought at the box office beginning one hour before showtime or online at  Questions or problems, call 706-253-2800 and leave a message.

Jasperse introduces gun law legislation

Bill will increase the number of places Georgians can carry firearms


A major new piece of Second Amendment legislation was introduced last week in the Georgia General Assembly by State Rep. Rick Jasperse, who represents Pickens County. The legislation would increase the number of places Georgians can carry firearms, including churches, bars and college campuses.

            "We're trying to open up some places where the rule followers can go,” said State Rep. Rick Jasperse. “This is not about making us a more armed society. It allows the rule followers to take care of themselves if they need to."


            H.B. 512, known as the “Safe Carry Protection Act,” was introduced by Jasperse. It would also allow men and women over the age of 18 who are serving in the military or have been honorably discharged from the military to be able to purchase a gun.

See additional reporting on  Safe Carry Protection Act in this week's print edition.

Bigfoot (Sasquatch, Yeti, Wooly Booger) lives?

Researchers, enthusiasts converge in Dahlonega for Bigfoot conference



Bigfoot art at the Midnight Walker's Southeastern Bigfoot Conference, held January 12-13 in Dahlonega.

    Driving to the Midnight Walker’s Southeastern Bigfoot Conference felt like entering a secret meeting in Shangri-La. Fog hung thick over Burnt Mountain all the way to Dahlonega, then hugged the lodge at R Ranch where the convention was held. 
    No one could see in or out. 
    The 100 or so attendees cocooned inside the building were getting situated for a weekend-long event that would bring Bigfoot experts, researchers, lecturers, and enthusiasts to the first ever Bigfoot convention in the southeast, held January 12 -13. 
    I took my seat, too, mulling over questions I would ask when it came time to interview. The sarcastic side of me wanted to invoke the spirit of The Daily Show and ask about things that only related to the 1987 film Harry and the Hendersons. Things like, “Do you think Bigfoot would gut laugh watching a monkey on television?” or, “Do you think John Lithgow could lure Sasquatch into a vehicle using only a sac of cheeseburgers?”
    I decided that wasn’t a good idea. Plus, I really was interested in what the presenters had to say because in my mind anything is possible, plus I know a guy who swears he had an encounter here in Pickens.
    See this week's print or online editions for the rest of this story.

Trout fishing opportunities year-round in N. Ga.


SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (Feb. 26, 2013) – Trout-angling opportunities abound in the wintery swift-flowing waters of north Georgia’s rivers and creeks.


Home to some of the Southeast’s finest trout streams and three species of trout - rainbow, brown and brook trout - Georgia claims nearly 4,000 miles of streams, and more than half lie in the northern part of the state in the Chattahoochee National Forest.


“Georgia offers trout anglers with various opportunities throughout the year – including delayed harvest streams, seasonal streams and year-round streams,” says John Biagi, chief of fisheries management for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.