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Monday fire that endangered family a criminal act, says fire marshal

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Damon Howell / Photo

An insurance adjuster measures the remnants of a house which caught fire early Monday morning on Carlan Road.

 

In a stunning twist, the county fire marshal said late Wednesday, the blaze on Carlan Road which destroyed a home and threatened a family’s lives appears to have been intentionally set.

Assistant Fire Chief Curtis Clark, who also serves as the fire marshal, said, “We are ruling this was an intentionally set fire and a criminal act against the homeowners.”

The fire was reported at 1:14 a.m. Monday when a Pickens deputy on routine patrol spotted the front porch of the Carlan Road home in flames.

Pickens dog later found to be rabid creates exposure problem for many following Thanksgiving dinner

From North Ga. Health District

An unvaccinated Boxer belonging to a family on Damascus Road tested positive for rabies on December 6. As a result, environmental health officials had to recommend post rabies exposure treatment to people who most recently handled the dog before it was euthanized on December 5.

Almost thirty people were evaluated for rabies exposure in this case because the dog had been present during a Thanksgiving family gathering in Pickens County. There was no indication of exposure to those persons; however, six other people, including two veterinary technicians and four family members, were considered potentially exposed. Five have begun post-exposure rabies treatments, but one family member has declined to undergo post-exposure preventive treatments.

Cards for Cody -- Family asks community for help

 

 

 

 

A minute after he was born, Cody Jones stopped breathing. Twenty years and more than 60 surgeries later, Cody is a junior at Pickens High School and making the best of life.

Although he was delivered following a normal, full term pregnancy, Cody faced, among other things, a rare lung disease and a severe heart condition that forced him to have open-heart surgery when he was just three weeks old.

“We stayed at Kennestone for three weeks and then went to Egleston, and they found out what all was wrong with him,” said his mother, Angie Jones.

Born in 1991 to Mark and Angie Jones, Cody spent his first five and a half months in a hospital, before being sent home on oxygen and a ventilator. When he left the hospital, his parents and older sister Haley weren’t given much hope, the mother said.

Over the years, things didn’t improve as doctors discovered more and more medical issues.

“Really I couldn’t count the number of surgeries he’s had – it’s 60 plus. He’s got a rare lung disease called bronchomalschia and a heart condition. His open-heart surgery when he was three weeks old was his first surgery. He’s been in and out of Egleston the whole 20 years since he was born.”

Cody now has a trachostophy and uses an oxygen tank during the day fitted with a speaking valve.

“We’ve always called him our miracle,” Jones said.

Putting the Green in the Christmas Tree at Harmony Elementary

 

Above, The Environmental Club at Harmony Elementary created Christmas ornaments from trash to show how recycling can work.

Written by students from

Harmony Elementary School

Environmental Club members at Harmony Elementary School created ornaments from trash or recycled materials to decorate the hallway tree. Recycling is a daily chore for the Environmental Club. The fifth-grade students gather recycled materials and place them in the outside recycle  bin.

Students at Harmony are diligent in placing recycle materials in the classroom bins to be gathered for regular recycling.

Favorite ornaments from this year and previous years overflowed the beautiful recycled tree.  Students were challenged to use their imaginations to create ornaments from unusable items that would have been thrown away otherwise.

The students created many types of ornaments, from snowmen to Christmas trees made from pop tops.


Top tips for holiday cooking

 

“Healthy” and “holiday cooking” mix about as well as oil and water, but last Thursday the staff at Piedmont Mountainside Medical Hospital busted open that oxymoron with tips for a sugar-free, sodium-free yuletide meal perfect for diabetics or others with dietary restrictions.

The sounds and smell of cooking rosemary and garlic permeated the hospital cafeteria, where Chef “Sam,” along with a hospital dietician, physician and a local pharmacist were on site to demonstrate cooking and field questions from the room of Dinner and Discussion participants.