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Op-ed, blogs and columns

Life Coach on 15 and 20 year olds dating

Handling religious e-mails

 

By Vicki Roberts

Life Coach

 

Dear Vicki,

My friends know I am not a religious person but many of them repeatedly forward religious e-mails to me. It annoys me. 

 

Dear Reader,

You have 2 choices: You can reply to the e-mails and let them know you prefer not to get those types of e-mails or just delete them. If you can, it’s best to just delete them.  

 

Dear Vicki,

My daughter is 15 and is dating a 20-year-old boy. He is very nice and I like him a lot. My friends are giving me a hard time about letting her date him but I feel like if I don’t allow it, they will see each other anyway.  Should I make them see each other behind my back?

 

Dear Reader,

I don’t know where to start.  He may be a nice guy but the age difference at their age is too great. When she is 20 and he is 25, it won’t be an issue but now it certainly is. You need to have a talk with both of them and let them know that as her parent, you need to protect your daughter and you don’t feel that letting them continue the relationship right now is in her best interest.  She needs friends her own age  (within a year or 2) and he should be looking for someone closer to his own age. If you catch them sneaking around to see each other then your daughter needs to be punished. Let her know in advance what her consequences will be and make them severe.     

 

Vicki can be reached at 

LifeCoachofGeor This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . She is available for individual counseling/ coaching sessions and has evening and weekend appointments available. Her website is www.LifeCoachofGeorgia.com

The biggest mistake(s) parents make

 

Parenting expert offers advice

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By John Rosemond

Copyright 2013, John K. Rosemond

A journalist recently asked, “What is the biggest mistake parents make?” I had to think about that. Which parents? The biggest mistake made by some parents is they pay entirely too much attention to and do entirely too much for their children. These children usually, but not always, end up as spoiled brats. Why not always? Because some children, by mysterious means, manage to do well in spite of less-than-optimal parenting. The notion that one is produced by the manner in which one is raised is belied by the many exceptions, including children who do well despite bad upbringings and children who do badly in spite of good upbringings.

On the other hand, some parents’ biggest mistake is that they pay entirely too little attention to their kids. Those folks are not generally found reading parenting columns, so I will not belabor their misdeeds. It would only serve the purpose of giving my regular readers reason to celebrate themselves, which is an untoward thing to do under any circumstances.

[Need advice with your kids, your family? Each the week the Progress runs columns from national experts like Rosemond and from local Life Coach Vicki Roberts.]

 

Cluster development approved for local Habitat group

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    The local Habitat for Humanity affiliate got the go-ahead from the planning commission Monday night to develop an area on Lance Road for seven  homes with an option to purchase another 10 acres for future houses at the same site.
    Habitat for Humanity Pickens County was seeking a rezoning from agricultural to suburban residential on the entire 18-acre parcel to allow the cluster of homes.

 

Pickens County Budget Meetings, October 21-23. Be There.

By Joe Kelly

When the housing industry collapsed in 2008, the adverse effects were felt in Pickens by spring 2009. Gone were waves of construction workers. Trucks no longer delivered building materials. Out of town home buyers vanished. Empty chairs greeted worried restaurant owners. 

Concrete plants, building supply houses and other local businesses saw precipitous declines in store traffic and sales. Banking was paralyzed. Two local banks have since closed their doors. Before 2009 ended property values plunged 30 percent and haven’t recovered. Layoffs engulfed the private sector. The downturn was steep, abrupt and widespread.

In the intervening five years it’s gotten worse. One-third of the buildings in Jasper’s downtown district are vacant. Newer commercial developments along 515 and elsewhere in the county are similarly distressed. Businesses familiar to the community for years have evaporated. Many of those that remain have downsized. Some are barely holding on. 

New startups seem to close before the paint dries on the signage announcing their arrival. Many private sector workers have seen incomes disappear. Careers have ended. Part time work at 20 percent of previous take home is the new normal.

 

Personal and business credit has been destroyed. Foreclosures have been pouring through the Pickens Progress unabated for five years. 

Whether starter homes, tiny subdivisions or some of our wealthiest land owners, no segment has been spared. Fortunes have been ruined, lives and marriages torn apart under the strain, families displaced. Everyone knows of a foreclosed property in their neighborhood. Land is offered at 1980s pricing. No one is buying. This isn’t a recession. It’s a depression. No one in the private sector has escaped unaffected.

Government, however, hasn’t participated. Since the 1960s government has raised two generations of its own members to feel that their careers are entitlements. Private sector pay levels can decline (median private sector income is down $2000 nationally since 2010) and its jobs can evaporate but government positions and pay levels are unassailable. 

Tax producers (private sector) can suffer but tax consumers (government) cannot. That view is going to change. There is nothing sacred about government.

Elected officials need to come to these meetings prepared to cut spending systemwide by 20 percent. Government will participate in this downturn. Any successful business owner who has survived at least one economic down cycle can reduce government expenditures by 20 percent without breaking a sweat. There’s at least that much inefficiency in government.

Nowhere is governmental arrogance more tangibly evident than in our property tax system. Despite all the hardships enumerated in this piece, assessed values in the county remain at 2008 levels, and net millage rates have increased three times since that year. This can’t pass a reality check. To paraphrase Disraeli, “there are lies, damned lies and government statistics.” 

The result has been that government quietly pocketed an unconscionable 30 percent  property tax increase in each of the past five years. That is property theft. Nothing in government’s judgement supported lowering assessments during this timeframe. In the real world we know that this isn’t true.

Anyone who has refinanced since 2008 has written proof of the sharp decline in values. It’s as if government is posing the question raised by the late sage, Groucho Marx. “Who are you gonna believe, me or your lying eyes?” Officials need to prepare plans to reduce property taxes by 30 percent for the next five years in order to return monies wrongly confiscated under false pretenses.

Absent resistance, government will always put its own best interests ahead of the taxpayers’. The past five years are proof of that. Taxpayers need to attend these sessions if we are to make government live within our means. We will have less government and we will have less cost of government but only if we make our voices and concerns known at these budget meetings. We own government. Department by department, we need to decide how much of our government we want to employ.

[Following a corporate career, Joe Kelly started his own company, designing and building homes for more than 20 years. A six term past president of the Pickens County Builders Association he has lived in Pickens County, which he considers the center of the universe, for 12 years. He is now enjoying retirement.]

Live snakes and more for summer library programs

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    Don’t miss Jason Clark with Southeastern Snake Encounter at the Pickens County Library at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 15.

Live Snakes @ Southeastern Snake Encounter
    This is one event that you won’t want to miss! Snakes of all kinds are coming to the library this Saturday, June 15, at 10 a.m. Southeastern Reptile Rescue will teach us about different snakes and reptiles in this fun and educational program. Live snakes will be present. Children of all ages are invited to attend; 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. This program is sponsored by the Jasper Lions Club.